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Lauren Neal

Assistant Professor
Department of Psychology
Psychology Program
Office
MB Room 3114

Dr. Neal is an assistant professor of psychology and a social psychologist. Her research focuses on the neural correlates of motivational and emotional processes and she employs psychophysiological measures (EEG) to study these processes. She teaches courses in statistics, cognitive psychology, physiological psychology, and social neuroscience.

Dr. Neal is accepting Senior Honors Thesis students and Master’s Thesis students.

Education

  • Ph.D. in Experimental Social Psychology, University of Alabama 2019
  • M.A. in Experimental Psychology, University of Alabama 2016
  • B.A. (summa cum laude) in Psychology, Lee University 2014

Research Interests

Dr. Neal studies the interaction between motivation, emotion, and neural processes. She investigates the neural correlates of motivational control at both the state and trait level, particularly in the context of risk taking and impulsivity. Her research primarily uses electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate asymmetric activation of the frontal cortex and event-related potentials (ERPs) related to emotion, reward, and attentional processing.

Recent Publications

Lacey, M.F., Neal, L.B., & Gable, P.A. (2020). Effortful Control of Motivation, not Withdrawal Motivation, Relates to Greater Right Frontal Asymmetry. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 147(1), 18-25.

Neal, L.B. & Gable, P.A. (2019). Shifts in Frontal Asymmetry Underlying Impulsive and Controlled Decision Making. Biological Psychology, 140(1), 28-34.

Gable, P.A., Neal, L.B., & Threadgill, A.H. (2018). Regulatory Behavior and Frontal Asymmetry: Considering the Role of revised-BIS in Relative Right Frontal Asymmetry. Psychophysiology, 55(1), 1-18.

Neal, L.B. & Gable, P.A. (2017). Regulatory Control and Impulsivity Relate to Resting Frontal Activity. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 12(9), 1377-1383.

Ryerson, N.C., Neal, L.B. & Gable, P.A. (2017). Attenuating the Alcohol Allure: Attentional Broadening Reduces Rapid Motivational Response to Alcohol Pictures. Psychopharmacology, 234(8), 1247-1254.

Courses Taught

PSYC1301 Intro to Psychology

PSYC3301 Introductory Statistics

PSYC4304 Physiological Psychology

PSYC4311 Cognitive Psychology

PSYC4394 Senior Honors Thesis

PSYC4389/6389 Social Neuroscience Special Topics Seminar

Last Updated: 11/06/2020